Love Food Hate Waste

We throw away 7.2 million tonnes of food and drink from our homes every year, that’s equivalent to filling Wembley Stadium with food waste more than seven times over! Some of this waste is non-edible like peelings, cores and bones, but over half is, or once was, perfectly good food.

This is a waste of resources. Just think about all the energy, water and packaging used in food production, transportation and storage. We also waste our hard earned cash, binning around £480 per household a year in unused food – a massive £12 billion nationally. But most importantly, throwing away food has serious environmental implications. Food is a type of organic waste, and organic waste releases methane when binned. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

If we stopped throwing away unused food, it would have the same environmental impact as taking one in five cars off the road in the UK – that’s a lot of CO2 saved!

The most common reasons why food is wasted are that we cook or prepare too much or we don’t use food in time. One way to find out more about what you might be wasting at home is to get curious about it and complete a week’s food diary. It is guaranteed to give you some interesting insights into your own habits in the kitchen!

Here are some top tips to avoid food waste:

  • Plan your meals and plan your shopping - this will save you time, money and food!
  • Write a shopping list for your meal plan so you only buy what you really need.
  • Keep essentials in the cupboard, fridge and freezer and keep an eye on 'use by' and 'best before' dates.
  • Use your leftovers and pull together a delicious meal by combining them with your favourite essentials. Here are some great recipes to use up your leftovers.
  • Make sure your portion size is right and check out the online portion calculator.

For more great tips, recipes, food facts, portioning, storage and money-saving advice visit www.lovefoodhatewaste.com.

Interesting Facts

Throwing away food has serious environmental implications.

Food is a type of organic waste, and organic waste releases methane when buried in landfill sites. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.